The kyphoscoliosis (ky) mouse is deficient in hypertrophic responses and is caused by a mutation in a novel muscle-specific protein

G Blanco, G R Coulton, A Biggin, C Grainge, J Moss, M Barrett, A Berquin, G Maréchal, M Skynner, P van Mier, A Nikitopoulou, M Kraus, C P Ponting, RM Mason, S D Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The ky mouse mutant exhibits a primary degenerative myopathy preceding chronic thoraco-lumbar kyphoscoliosis. The histopathology of the ky mutant suggests that Ky protein activity is crucial for normal muscle growth and function as well as the maturation and stabilization of the neuromuscular junction. Muscle hypertrophy in response to increasing demand is deficient in the ky mutant, whereas adaptive fibre type shifts take place. The ky locus has previously been localized to a small region of mouse chromosome 9 and we have now identified the gene and the mutation underlying the kyphoscoliotic mouse. The ky transcript encodes a novel protein that is detected only in skeletal muscle and heart. The identification of the ky gene will allow detailed analysis of the impact of primary myopathy on idiopathic scoliosis in mice and man.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-16
Number of pages8
JournalHuman Molecular Genetics
Volume10
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

Keywords

  • Amino Acid Sequence
  • Animals
  • Blotting, Northern
  • Cloning, Molecular
  • Disease Models, Animal
  • Homozygote
  • Hypertrophy
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Mice
  • Microscopy, Confocal
  • Microscopy, Video
  • Models, Genetic
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Muscles
  • Muscular Diseases
  • Mutation
  • Myosin Heavy Chains
  • Neuromuscular Junction
  • Protein Isoforms
  • Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • Scoliosis
  • Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
  • Tissue Distribution
  • Transglutaminases

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