The long reach of the gene

Gary J. Lewis*, Timothy C. Bates

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

One does not have to look very hard to observe that people differ greatly in their social and political attitudes. Views on religion, gun control, free markets, and political parties can divide rooms. But from where do these differences in opinion emerge? And what do genes and biology have to do with this apparently most social of questions?

This essay describes a growing body of work suggesting that our biological makeup influences our social and political attitudes and explores the methods that underpin such claims. The authors argue that the conclusions from this work are increasingly clear: understanding political divides will require biological as well as social explanations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-198
Number of pages5
JournalThe Psychologist
Volume26
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • SOCIAL-ATTITUDES
  • TRAITS
  • BRAIN STRUCTURE
  • POLITICAL ORIENTATIONS
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • ASSOCIATION
  • TRANSMISSION

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