The medial entorhinal cortex is necessary for the stimulus control over hippocampal place fields by distal, but not proximal, landmarks

Elizabeth Allison, Joe Moore, Daisy Arkell, Julia Thomas, Paul A Dudchenko, Emma R. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

A fundamental property of place cells in the hippocampus is the anchoring of their firing fields to salient landmarks within the environment. However, it is unclear how such information reaches the hippocampus. In the current experiment, we tested the hypothesis that the stimulus control exerted by distal visual landmarks requires input from the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). Place cells were recorded from mice with ibotenic acid lesions of the MEC (n = 7) and from sham-lesioned mice (n = 6) following 90° rotations of either distal landmarks or proximal cues in a cue- controlled environment. We found that lesions of the MEC impaired the anchoring of place fields to distal landmarks, but not proximal cues. We also observed that, relative to sham-lesioned mice, place cells in animals with MEC lesions exhibited significantly reduced spatial information and increased sparsity. These results support the view that distal landmark information reaches the hippocampus via the MEC, but that proximal cue information can do so via an alternative neural pathway.
Original languageEnglish
JournalHippocampus
Early online date20 Feb 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Feb 2023

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