The mode of host-parasite interaction shapes coevolutionary dynamics and the fate of host cooperation

Benjamin J. Z. Quigley, Diana Garcia Lopez*, Angus Buckling, Alan J. McKane, Sam P. Brown

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Antagonistic coevolution between hosts and parasites can have a major impact on host population structures, and hence on the evolution of social traits. Using stochastic modelling techniques in the context of bacteria-virus interactions, we investigate the impact of coevolution across a continuum of host-parasite genetic specificity (specifically, where genotypes have the same infectivity/resistance ranges (matching alleles, MA) to highly variable ranges (gene-for-gene, GFG)) on population genetic structure, and on the social behaviour of the host. We find that host cooperation is more likely to be maintained towards the MA end of the continuum, as the more frequent bottlenecks associated with an MA-like interaction can prevent defector invasion, and can even allow migrant cooperators to invade populations of defectors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3742-3748
Number of pages7
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences
Volume279
Issue number1743
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Sep 2012

Keywords

  • BACTERIA
  • coevolution
  • SYSTEM
  • virus
  • TRADE-OFF
  • LOCAL ADAPTATION
  • genetic specificity
  • GENE-FOR-GENE
  • bacteria
  • cooperation
  • PHAGE INTERACTIONS
  • RED-QUEEN
  • ANTAGONISTIC COEVOLUTION
  • EVOLUTION
  • SELECTION

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