The mononuclear phagocyte system of the pig as a model for understanding human innate immunity and disease

Lynsey Fairbairn, Ronan Kapetanovic, David P Sester, David A Hume

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The biology of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system has been studied extensively in the mouse. Studies of the pig as an experimental model have commonly been consigned to specialist animal science journals. In this review, we consider some of the many ways in which the innate immune systems of humans differ from those of mice, the ways that pigs may address the shortcomings of mice as models for the study of macrophage differentiation and activation in vitro, and the biology of sepsis and other pathologies in the living animal. With the completion of the genome sequence and the characterization of many key regulators and markers, the pig has emerged as a tractable model of human innate immunity and disease that should address the limited, predictive value of rodents in preclinical studies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)855-871
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Leukocyte Biology
Volume89
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

Keywords

  • hematopoiesis
  • inflammation
  • host-pathogen interactions

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