The OPTICON technology roadmap for optical and infrared astronomy

Colin Cunningham, David Melotte, Frank Molster

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The Key Technology Network (KTN) within the OPTICON programme has been developing a roadmap for the technology needed to meet the challenges of optical and infrared astronomy over the next few years, with particular emphasis on the requirements of Extremely Large Telescopes. The process and methodology so far will be described, along with the most recent roadmap.

The roadmap shows the expected progression of ground-based astronomy facilities and the technological developments which will be required to realise these new facilities. The roadmap highlights the key stages in the development of these technologies.

In some areas, such as conventional optics, gradual developments in areas such as light-weighting of optics will slowly be adopted into future instruments. In other areas, such as large area IR detectors, more rapid progress can be expected as new processing techniques allow larger and faster arrays. Finally, other areas such as integrated photonics have the potential to revolutionise astronomical instrumentation.

Future plans are outlined, in particular our intention to look at longer term development and disruptive technologies.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMODERN TECHNOLOGIES IN SPACE- AND GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES AND INSTRUMENTATION
EditorsE AtadEttedgui, D Lemke
Place of PublicationBELLINGHAM
PublisherSPIE
Pages-
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)978-0-81948-229-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventConference On Modern Technologies in Space- and Ground-Based Telescopes and Instrumentation - San Diego
Duration: 27 Jun 20102 Jul 2010

Conference

ConferenceConference On Modern Technologies in Space- and Ground-Based Telescopes and Instrumentation
CitySan Diego
Period27/06/102/07/10

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