The oral microbiome and breast cancer and nonmalignant breast disease, and its relationship with the fecal microbiome in the Ghana Breast Health Study

Zeni Wu, Doratha A Byrd, Yunhu Wan, Daniel Ansong, Joe-Nat Clegg-Lamptey, Beatrice Wiafe-Addai, Lawrence Edusei, Ernest Adjei, Nicholas Titiloye, Florence Dedey, Francis Aitpillah, Joseph Oppong, Verna Vanderpuye, Ernest Osei-Bonsu, Casey L Dagnall, Kristine Jones, Amy Hutchinson, Belynda D Hicks, Thomas U Ahearn, Jianxin ShiRob Knight, Richard Biritwum, Joel Yarney, Seth Wiafe, Baffour Awuah, Kofi Nyarko, Jonine D Figueroa, Rashmi Sinha, Montserrat Garcia-Closas, Louise A Brinton, Emily Vogtmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The oral microbiome, like the fecal microbiome, may be related to breast cancer risk. Therefore, we investigated whether the oral microbiome was associated with breast cancer and nonmalignant breast disease, and its relationship with the fecal microbiome in a case-control study in Ghana. A total of 881 women were included (369 breast cancers, 93 nonmalignant cases and 419 population-based controls). The V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from oral and fecal samples. Alpha-diversity (observed amplicon sequence variants [ASVs], Shannon index and Faith's Phylogenetic Diversity) and beta-diversity (Bray-Curtis, Jaccard and weighted and unweighted UniFrac) metrics were computed. MiRKAT and logistic regression models were used to investigate the case-control associations. Oral sample alpha-diversity was inversely associated with breast cancer and nonmalignant breast disease with odds ratios (95% CIs) per every 10 observed ASVs of 0.86 (0.83-0.89) and 0.79 (0.73-0.85), respectively, compared to controls. Beta-diversity was also associated with breast cancer and nonmalignant breast disease compared to controls (P ≤ .001). The relative abundances of Porphyromonas and Fusobacterium were lower for breast cancer cases compared to controls. Alpha-diversity and presence/relative abundance of specific genera from the oral and fecal microbiome were strongly correlated among breast cancer cases, but weakly correlated among controls. Particularly, the relative abundance of oral Porphyromonas was strongly, inversely correlated with fecal Bacteroides among breast cancer cases (r = -.37, P ≤ .001). Many oral microbial metrics were strongly associated with breast cancer and nonmalignant breast disease, and strongly correlated with fecal microbiome among breast cancer cases, but not controls.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Early online date3 Jun 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Jun 2022

Keywords

  • Ghana
  • breast cancer
  • fecal microbiome
  • nonmalignant breast diseases
  • oral microbiome

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