“[T]he People that Should Have Lived Here”: Haunting, the economy, and home in Tana French’s Broken Harbour

Shelley Ingram*, Willow G. Mullins

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

Ingram and Mullins examine the ghostly nature of Tana French’s 2012 novel Broken Harbour, arguing that French deliberately engages discourses of haunting to manifest the almost mystical ways in which unseen hegemonic forces invade the most sacrosanct of domestic spaces. To represent such hauntings in crime fiction is to reveal the inextricable lines between the past and the present, between domestic home life and organizing systems of social power. French’s ghosts—which are personal, communal, and national—are set against the backdrop of the Celtic Tiger era of economic prosperity and the bust which followed, exposing the deep connections between crime, gender, family, and economics.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDomestic Noir
Subtitle of host publicationThe New Face of 21st Century Crime Fiction
EditorsLaura Joyce, Henry Sutton
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter9
Pages161-179
Number of pages19
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9783319693385
ISBN (Print)9783319693378, 9783030098841
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2018

Publication series

NameCrime Files
ISSN (Print)2947-8340
ISSN (Electronic)2947-8359

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