The pro-inflammatory effects of low-toxicity low-solubility particles, nanoparticles and fine particles, on epithelial cells in vitro: the role of surface area

Claire Monteiller, Lang Tran, William MacNee, Steve Faux, Alan Jones, Brian Miller, Ken Donaldson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Rats exposed to high airborne mass concentrations of low-solubility low-toxicity particles (LSLTP) have been reported to develop lung disease such as fibrosis and lung cancer. These particles are regulated on a mass basis in occupational settings, but mass might not be the appropriate metric as animal studies have shown that nanoparticles (ultrafine particles) produce a stronger adverse effect than fine particles when delivered on an equal mass basis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)609-15
Number of pages7
JournalOccupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume64
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007

Keywords

  • Cells, Cultured
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Epithelial Cells
  • Glutathione
  • Humans
  • Inhalation Exposure
  • Interleukin-8
  • Lung Neoplasms
  • Nanoparticles
  • Oxidative Stress
  • Particle Size
  • Particulate Matter
  • Pulmonary Fibrosis
  • Quartz
  • RNA, Messenger
  • Respiratory Mucosa
  • Titanium

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