The protective power of friendship, advocacy and activism: A short report on the experiences of Who Cares? members and allies

Autumn Roesch-Marsh*, Marissa Roxburgh, Thomas Bartlett, Donna Nicholas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Friendship is valued by most children and young people around the world. In research on happiness, it is often identified as an essential ingredient for a happy life. In this short report we go further by exploring the importance of friendship as an ingredient in advocacy and activism. The report is written by two care experienced young people and two adult allies. The report explores how friendship makes advocacy and activism more possible and more powerful. Drawing on our reflections and personal experiences we discuss how having a space to make friends with others who have care experience and allies, and working together to effect change around policy and practice, has a protective impact on those working for change and those they support. These friendships are protective in practical and emotional ways, but they are also protective because they help hope to grow. We argue that the protective power of friendship, advocacy and activism should be more widely recognised as an important function of advocacy organisations like Who Cares? Scotland.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2823
JournalChild Abuse Review
Early online date7 Apr 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Apr 2023

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • advocacy
  • care experience
  • friendship
  • safeguarding

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