The Public Agenda: A Comparative Perspective

Shaun Bevan, Will Jennings

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter considers the question of what shapes the public agenda and how, in turn, the public agenda influences public policy. It introduces the survey question about the most important problem as a measure of the public agenda—comparing evidence on the policy issues attended to by publics in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Spain, and also the degree to which public opinion itself is subject to “punctuations.” The analysis shows how the public agenda reflects both the problem status and level of media coverage of certain issues (specifically crime and the economy). Lastly, it presents evidence on the correspondence between the priorities of citizens and those of policymakers.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComparative Policy Agendas
Subtitle of host publicationTheory, Tools, Data
EditorsFrank Baumgartner, Christian Breunig, Emiliano Grossman
Place of PublicationOxford, United Kingdom
PublisherOxford University Press
Chapter25
Pages219-242
ISBN (Print)9780198835332
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • public opinion
  • most important problem
  • agenda representation
  • media agenda-setting
  • United States
  • United Kingdom
  • Spain
  • Comparative Agendas Project

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