The rationale for energy efficiency policy: Assessing the recognition of the multiple benefits of energy efficiency retrofit policy

Niall Kerr, Andy Gouldson, John Barrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The rationale for energy efficiency policy is increasingly
framed by interest groups in terms of its perceived multiple benefits. As
the perceived benefits of policy are not recognised uniformly in
different national policy contexts, this paper considers the case of
energy efficiency retrofit policy and seeks to assess the extent to which
a selection of the perceived benefits of energy efficiency have been used
in the overall rationale for retrofit policy. Considering the case
studies of the UK, Germany, New Zealand and Ireland we characterise the
rationale for policy in each context and assess whether the rationale may
have changed over time. The analysis identifies some marked differences
in policy rationale between case studies, with the recognition of
benefits and the ensuing rationale for policy, resulting from a complex
mix of political, social and economic influences. Recognition of the
multiple perceived benefits of policy may not necessarily equate to
multiplied policy support. Instead it is more likely that different
rationales for policy will have relevance at different times, for
different audiences. It may also be important to consider whether the
ultimate rationale leaves retrofit framed as economic or social policy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)212-221
JournalEnergy Policy
Volume106
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • efficiency
  • retrofit
  • multiple benefits
  • agenda setting
  • policy rationale

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