The risks of using allogeneic cell lines for vaccine production: The example of Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia

Lindert Benedictus, Charlotte Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP) is a hemorrhagic disease that emerged in calves across Europe in 2007. Its occurrence is attributed to immunization of the calf’s mother with a vaccine produced using an allogeneic cell line. Vaccine-induced alloantibodies specific for major-histocompatibility class I antigens are transferred from the mother to the calf via colostrum, leading to profound depletion of peripheral blood and bone marrow cells that is often fatal.

Areas covered: Pubmed and Web of Science were used to search for literature relevant to BNP and the use of allogeneic vaccine cell lines. Following a review of the pathology and pathogenesis of this novel condition, we discuss potential risks associated with the use of allogeneic vaccine cell lines.

Expert commentary: Although BNP is associated with a specific vaccine, it highlights safety concerns common to all vaccines produced using allogeneic cell lines. Measures to prevent similar vaccine-induced alloimmune-mediated adverse events in the future are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-71
JournalExpert Review of Vaccines
Volume16
Issue number1
Early online date17 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Vaccine safety
  • Vaccine production
  • Alloantibody
  • Allogeneic
  • Alloimmune
  • Bovine
  • Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP)
  • Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC I)
  • Cell line
  • Colostrum
  • Hematopoietic

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The risks of using allogeneic cell lines for vaccine production: The example of Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this