THE ROLE OF ANOXIA IN ORGANIC-MATTER PRESERVATION IN COASTAL SEDIMENTS - RELATIVE STABILITIES OF THE MAJOR BIOCHEMICALS UNDER OXIC AND ANOXIC DEPOSITIONAL CONDITIONS

GL COWIE, JI HEDGES, Gregory Cowie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sediment trap and core samples from two coastal environments, Dabob Bay (Washington State) and Saanich Inlet (British Columbia), which differ primarily in terms of bottom-water O2 concentrations, were analysed for organic carbon, total nitrogen, amino acids, neutral sugars and lignin phenols. Comparison of these sites provides a test of the effects of anoxia on the preservation of sediment organic matter (OM). Biochemical compositions indicate lower concentrations of terrigenous OM in Saanich Inlet than in Dabob Bay. The benthic interface is an important site of diagenesis in both cases, with similar patterns of selective degradation. Although absolute reactivities at the benthic interface are consistently higher in Dabob Bay (oxic) than in Saanlich Inlet (anoxic), burial efficiencies for all measured OM components are indistinguishable under the two different regimes. Collectively, these results indicate that O2 availability ultimately has little or no independent effect on OM preservation in these environments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-234
Number of pages6
JournalOrganic Geochemistry
Volume19
Issue number1-3
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1992
Event15TH INTERNATIONAL MEETING ON ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY : ADVANCES IN ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY 1991 - MANCHESTER, United Kingdom
Duration: 16 Sep 199120 Sep 1991

Keywords

  • ANOXIA
  • BURIAL EFFICIENCY
  • ORGANIC MATTER
  • PRESERVATION
  • SEDIMENT
  • BRITISH-COLUMBIA
  • EARLY DIAGENESIS
  • SAANICH INLET
  • MARINE BAY
  • DABOB BAY
  • CARBON
  • CHROMATOGRAPHY
  • HYDROCARBONS
  • WASHINGTON
  • NITROGEN

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