The role of the broader autism phenotype and environmental stressors in the adjustment of siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders in Taiwan and the United Kingdom

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Abstract

The influence of the broader autism phenotype (BAP) on the adjustment of siblings of children with autism has previously been researched mainly in Western cultures. The present research evaluated a diathesis-stress model of sibling adjustment using a questionnaire study including 80 and 75 mother-typically developing sibling dyads in Taiwan and the United Kingdom (UK). UK siblings reported elevated adjustment difficulties compared to the Taiwanese sample and to normative data. Whilst higher BAP levels were generally associated with greater adjustment difficulties, differences were found across cultures and respondents. Although significant diathesis-stress interactions were found, these were in the opposite direction from those predicted by the model, and differed across cultural settings. Implications for culturally-sensitive sibling support are considered.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2363-2377
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume47
Issue number8
Early online date13 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Aug 2017

Keywords

  • autism
  • broader autism phenotype
  • typically developing sibling
  • adjustment
  • cross-culture

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