The social functions of music: Communication, Wellbeing, Art, Ritual, Identity and Social networks (C- WARIS)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract / Description of output

This chapter outlines the social function of music, emphasising music as a universally accessible, social phenomenon. I propose five categories and one overarching caveat represented by the anacronym C-WARIS (Communication, Wellbeing, Art, Ritual, Identity and Social Networks). The primary social function of music is communication. Music is utilised in maintaining and enhancing wellbeing and as a pleasurable art form. It functions universally with within religious, spiritual and ceremonial activities. Music also functions as a resource in establishing and maintaining identities and social networks. Reciprocal determinism (Bandura, 1986) and social identity theory (Turner & Reynolds 2010) are used to offer overarching theoretical contexts for these mechanisms.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRoutledge International Handbook of Music Psychology in Education and the Community
EditorsAndrea Creech, Donald A. Hodges, Susan Hallam
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter1
Pages5-21
Number of pages16
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9780429295362
ISBN (Print)9780367271800
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 May 2021

Publication series

NameRoutledge International Handbooks

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