The truth in fake news: How disinformation laws are reframing the concepts of truth and accuracy on digital platforms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The European Union’s (EU) strategy to address the spread of disinformation, and most notably the Code of Practice on Disinformation and the forthcoming Digital Services Act, tasks digital platforms with a range of actions to minimise the distribution of issue-based and political adverts that are verifiably false or misleading. This article discusses the implications of the EU’s approach with a focus on its categorical approach, specifically what it means to conceptualise disinformation as a form of advertisement and by what standards digital platforms are expected to assess the truthful or misleading nature of the content they distribute because of this categorisation. The analysis will show how the emerging EU anti-disinformation framework marks a departure from the European Court of Human Rights’ consolidated standards of review for public interest and commercial speech and the tests utilised to assess their accuracy.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Convention on Human Rights Law Review
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 6 Jun 2022

Keywords

  • disinformation
  • journalism
  • advertising
  • digital platforms
  • freedom of expression
  • media freedom

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