There is nothing paranormal about near-death experiences: how neuroscience can explain seeing bright lights, meeting the dead, or being convinced you are one of them

Dean Mobbs, Caroline Watt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Approximately 3% of Americans declare to have had a near-death experience [1]. These experiences classically involve the feeling that one's soul has left the body, approaches a bright light and goes to another reality, where love and bliss are all encompassing. Contrary to popular belief, research suggests that there is nothing paranormal about these experiences. Instead, near-death experiences are the manifestation of normal brain function gone awry, during a traumatic, and sometimes harmless, event.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)447-449
Number of pages3
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume15
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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