This nigger's broken: Hyper-masculinity, the buck, and the role of physical disability in white anxiety toward the black male body

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Abstract

On September 23, 2015, Mr. Jeremy McDole was executed by Wilmington, Delaware police officers. Mr. McDole was allegedly a threat to himself and suicidal. The police were responding to a “911 call reporting that [Mr. McDole] had shot himself.”1 The 911 caller can be heard yelling: “A man just shot himself in the AutoZone parking lot … he's fallen out of a wheelchair.”2 Mr. McDole was reported to the police as a victim, not a criminal. He was described as a disabled man with injury. A man who was suicidal; in need of help. His need, his victimhood, was not seen. He was not recognized by the police as a vulnerable person. He was seen as a Black man; a threat—a body marked for death by the danger he posed to others. This stereotype applied to his body, despite him being confined to a wheelchair. Like the deaths of hundreds of other Black males in America, his execution was recorded and subsequently released to the American public for summary judgment—just or unjust killing of a Black man
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-343
JournalJournal of Social Philosophy
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Sep 2017

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