Too much information: An examination of the effects of social self-disclosure embedded within Influencer eWOM campaigns

Sara Alrabiah, Ben Marder, David Marshall, Robert Angell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Social media influencers (SMIs) offer a unique form of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM), disclosing personal information (e.g., daily routines, major life events) as part of their pitch when promoting products. To date, no research has explored if, and how, social self-disclosure impacts the way recipients respond to promotions and the influencer themselves. Through four studies deploying a mixed method design (total N = 888), we redress this knowledge gap. We find that increased depth and breadth in social self-disclosure is viewed as inappropriate, reducing trust and purchase intent. We further validate appropriateness as the critical mediator in understanding the impact of self-disclosure within this marketing context. We also establish that the context of the post (sponsored vs. non-sponsored) and the audiences’ social media usage intensity together act as a boundary condition to the effects of high self-disclosure by SMI’s.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-105
JournalJournal of Business Research
Volume152
Early online date28 Jul 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2022

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • influencer
  • self-disclosure
  • EWOM
  • sponsored
  • appropriateness

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