Towards a comparative history of tonal text-setting practices in Southeast Asia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

A tone language is a language in which differences in pitch are used to distinguish lexical or grammatical meaning. While most modern Western European languages do not make use of pitch in this way, by some estimates up to 70% of the world’s languages may be tonal, including many of the world’s most widely spoken languages such as Mandarin Chinese, Punjabi, and Yoruba.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTranscultural Music History
Subtitle of host publicationGlobal Participation and Regional Diversity in the Modern Age
EditorsReinhard Strohm
Place of PublicationBerlin
PublisherBerliner Wissenschafts-Verlag
Chapter15
Pages291-312
ISBN (Print)9783861356561
Publication statusPublished - 16 Jan 2021

Publication series

NameIntercultural Music Studies
PublisherBerliner Wissenschafts-Verlag
Number24

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