Transforming (Private) Rights through (Public) International Law: Readings on a ‘Strange and Painful Odyssey’ in the PCIJ Mavrommatis Case1

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Abstract

Straddling both the centres of (European) power and the shifting dynamics of the post-Ottoman world in a quest to guarantee private rights through public international legal redress, the PCIJ Mavrommatis case provides a rich resource for interrogating the extent to which international law during the League period could speak for voices on the edge of empire. In this article, historical consideration of the regimes of empire and Mandate form the backdrop to an exploration into how international legal discourse (re)configured the relationship between the core and the periphery, especially for those peoples awaiting the promise of self-determination and sovereignty. The figure of a lone Greek investor and his dashed hopes in the newly created Palestine Mandate is the backdrop to this tale of ever-shifting interpretations of public and private rights, of speech as well as silence before and beyond the Peace Palace.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)873-97
JournalLeiden Journal of International Law
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • League of Nations
  • Mandate
  • Palestine
  • Permanent Court of International Justice
  • public/private distinction

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