Transition into adult healthcare services in Scotland –findings from a study concerning service users at the Scottish Spina Bifida Association

Sharon Levy, Andrew H D Wynd , Robert Carachi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Aims
Literature on interventions that enable young people with Spina Bifida and/or Hydrocephalus to have smooth transition, into adult healthcare services, stress the need for the process to start early and to include all family members. The study reported here was set to quantify and articulate the experiences of service users who are or due to be going through the transition process in Scotland today.

Methods and Results
Focus group sessions, in the North of Scotland and in the ‘Central Belt’, captured rich qualitative data. A survey, sent to eligible participants on the Spina Bifida National database, offered complimentary data source. Despite the fact that the number of returned questionnaires was low (n=20) data analysis identified a number of core recurring themes. These include issues concerning Communications, Respect, Choice and Control. Findings suggest that there is a significant chasm between the political rhetoric and the reality faced by young people with Spina Bifida moving to adult healthcare services.

Conclusion
A possible way to facilitate successful transition of young people is using personal healthcare information as the locus for needed change. More research is needed to ascertain whether a ‘Person Centred Record’, which is set to empower young people on their transition pathway, is an appropriate transition tool.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScottish Medical Journal
Early online date29 Oct 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Oct 2014

Keywords

  • Neurological conditions
  • Transition
  • Young People
  • Person Centred Record

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