Transnational approaches to teaching and learning in higher education: Challenges and possible guiding principles

Catherine Bovill, Lynette Jordan, Natalie Watters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The higher education sector has become increasingly internationalised over recent decades. This paper examines a range of challenges that can arise where teaching staff in one context support and implement learning and teaching initiatives in another international context – transnational teaching. We use examples and experiences from our own practice to highlight challenges that arise from implementing cross-cultural and transnational teaching and that warrant further exploration, including differing expectations; differing views of learners and learning; the illusory nature of transformed practice; and time constraints. We discuss these challenges in the light of Hofstede’s model of cultural dimensions as well as critiquing this model. We then highlight some possible guiding principles for transnational higher education work that include modelling good practice; ensuring reciprocity and mutual benefit; ensuring individual integrity and institutional credibility; and developing and supporting transnational staff.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-25
Number of pages13
JournalTeaching in Higher Education
Volume20
Issue number1
Early online date4 Aug 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • internationalisation
  • transnational
  • Higher Education

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