Twenty four-hour helpline access to expert management advice for food-allergy-triggered anaphylaxis in infants, children and young people: a pragmatic, randomized controlled trial

M. M. Kelleher, A. DunnGalvin, A. Sheikh, C. Cullinane, J. Fitzsimons, J. O'B. Hourihane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BackgroundAnaphylaxis is a life-threatening emergency. If promptly administered, adrenaline is potentially life-saving. Many food-allergic-children/carers are unsure when to use their adrenaline autoinjectors, contributing to a low quality of life and worse outcomes in the setting of an acute allergic reaction.

ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of 24-hour telephone access to specialist clinical advice on disease-specific quality of life.

MethodsA pragmatic two-arm, parallel-group randomized control trial was conducted. Children/carers (

ResultsFifty two children/carers were recruited. FAQL scores remained static in the control group across the three time points. Scores gradually improved in the intervention group, with a significant difference seen at 6months (T1-T3 Mean difference=-1.5, (CI 0.87-2.25) P

ConclusionThe 24-hour helpline improved food-allergy-specific quality of life in children. Six-month intervention support resulted in sustained benefits for at least a further 6months.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1598-1604
Number of pages7
JournalAllergy
Volume68
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Dec 2013

Keywords

  • adrenaline
  • anaphylaxis
  • food allergy
  • paediatrics
  • quality of life
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • QUESTIONNAIRE
  • EPINEPHRINE
  • ADOLESCENTS
  • GUIDELINES
  • CHILDHOOD
  • EMERGENCY
  • VALIDITY
  • EPIPEN
  • IMPACT

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