Two distinct signaling pathways activate the latent DNA binding function of p53 in a casein kinase II-independent manner

T R Hupp, D P Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Post-translational modification of a carboxyl-terminal negative regulatory domain in vitro by either casein kinase II or protein kinase C allosterically activates the latent sequence-specific DNA binding function of p53. Reported here is a biochemical approach to determine the types of signaling pathways and enzymes that are involved in p53 activation in cells. Using a novel chromatographic method, we have been able to separate three distinct biochemical forms of p53 that have been synthesized in vivo; two are in an activated state, and one is in a latent state for sequence-specific DNA binding. The two activated forms of p53 appear to be controlled individually by either a constitutive or a UV-inducible signaling pathway. p53 lacking the COOH-terminal casein kinase II site (p53 delta 4) was characterized biochemically and used to determine the affects of deletion of the casein kinase II motif on the production of the two activated forms of p53 in vivo. As observed with full-length p53, the production of two distinct chromatographic forms of activated p53 delta 4 occurs in vivo, indicating that p53 activation can occur through a casein kinase II-independent pathway and suggesting that two other factors are involved in activation of p53 in vivo.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18165-74
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume270
Issue number30
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jul 1995

Keywords

  • Amino Acid Sequence
  • Animals
  • Baculoviridae
  • Casein Kinase II
  • Cloning, Molecular
  • Escherichia coli
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Muscles
  • Protein Conformation
  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
  • Rabbits
  • Sequence Deletion
  • Signal Transduction
  • Spodoptera
  • Tumor Suppressor Protein p53

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