Ubiquitous Hepatocystis infections, but no evidence of Plasmodium falciparum-like malaria parasites in wild greater spot-nosed monkeys (Cercopithecus nictitans)

Ahidjo Ayouba, Fatima Mouacha, Gerald H. Learn, Eitel Mpoudi-Ngole, Julian C. Rayner, Paul M. Sharp, Beatrice H. Hahn, Eric Delaporte, Martine Peeters*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) have been identified as the natural reservoir of the parasites that were the immediate precursor of Plasmodium falciparum infecting humans. Recently, a P. falciparum-like sequence was reported in a sample from a captive greater spot-nosed monkey (Cercopithecus nictitans), and was taken to indicate that this species may also be a natural reservoir for P. falciparum-related parasites. To test this hypothesis we screened blood samples from 292 wild C nictitans monkeys that had been hunted for bushmeat in Cameroon. We detected Hepatocystis spp. in 49% of the samples, as well as one sequence from a clade of Plasmodium spp. previously found in birds, lizards and bats. However, none of the 292 wild C. nictitans harbored P. falciparum-like parasites. (C) 2012 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)709-713
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal For Parasitology
Volume42
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

Keywords

  • Greater spot-nosed monkey
  • Cercopithecus nictitans
  • Non-human primates
  • Malaria
  • Plasmodium falciparum
  • Hepatocystis
  • APES
  • ORIGIN

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