UK Iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Investigating human prion transmission across genotypic barriers using human tissue-based and molecular approaches

Diane L. Ritchie, Marcelo A. Barria, Alexander H. Peden, Helen M. Yull, James Kirkpatrick, Peter Adlard, James W. Ironside, Mark W. Head

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) is the prototypic human prion disease that occurs most commonly in sporadic and genetic forms, but it is also transmissible and can be acquired through medical procedures, resulting in iatrogenic CJD (iCJD). The largest numbers of iCJD cases that have occurred worldwide have resulted from contaminated cadaveric pituitary-derived human growth hormone (hGH) and its use to treat primary and secondary growth hormone deficiency. We report a comprehensive, tissue-based and molecular genetic analysis of the largest series of UK hGH-iCJD cases reported to date, including in vitro kinetic molecular modelling of genotypic factors influencing prion transmission. The results show the interplay of prion strain and host genotype in governing the molecular, pathological and temporal characteristics of the UK hGH-iCJD epidemic and provide insights into the adaptive mechanisms involved when prions cross genotypic barriers. We conclude that all of the available evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that the UK hGH-iCJD epidemic resulted from transmission of the V2 human prion strain, which is associated with the second most common form of sporadic CJD.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)579–595
Number of pages17
JournalActa Neuropathologica
Volume33
Issue number4
Early online date3 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Apr 2017

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