Undetectable gadolinium brain retention in individuals with an age-dependent blood-brain barrier breakdown in the hippocampus and mild cognitive impairment

Axel Montagne, Mikko T Huuskonen, Gautham Rajagopal, Melanie D Sweeney, Daniel A Nation, Farshid Sepehrband, Lina M D'Orazio, Michael G Harrington, Helena C Chui, Meng Law, Arthur W Toga, Berislav V Zlokovic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown is an early independent biomarker of human cognitive dysfunction, as found using gadolinium (Gd) as a contrast agent. Whether Gd accumulates in brains of individuals with an age-dependent BBB breakdown and/or mild cognitive impairment remains unclear.

METHODS: We analyzed T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans from 52 older participants with BBB breakdown in the hippocampus 19-28 months after either cyclic or linear Gd agent.

RESULTS: There was no change in T1-weighted signal intensity between the baseline contrast MRI and unenhanced MRI on re-examination in any of the studied 10 brain regions with either Gd agent suggesting undetectable Gd brain retention.

DISCUSSION: Gd does not accumulate in brains of older individuals with a BBB breakdown in the hippocampus. Thus, Gd agents can be used without risk of brain retention within a ∼2-year follow-up to study BBB in the aging human brain in relation to cognition and/or other pathologies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1568-1575
Number of pages8
JournalAlzheimer's & Dementia
Volume15
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Blood-Brain Barrier/drug effects
  • Brain/pathology
  • Cognitive Dysfunction/pathology
  • Contrast Media/administration & dosage
  • Female
  • Gadolinium/analysis
  • Hippocampus/pathology
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Neuropsychological Tests/statistics & numerical data

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