Universal development of emotion categories in natural language

R B Hupka, A P Lenton, K A Hutchison

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

Abstract

P. Shaver, I. Schwartz, D. Kirson, and C. O'Connor(1987) found that English emotion words fall into 25 categories of synonyms. To find emotion nomenclature universals, the authors used P. Shaver et aL's taxonomy in a sample of the world's languages and found that emotion categories were added in most languages in a relatively similar generalized sequence. Labeled first were the categories of anger and guilt; followed in Stage 2 by adoration, alarm, amusement, and depression; in Stage 3 by alienation, arousal, and agony; and ending with eagerness in Stage 4. The remaining 5 stages were derivatives of. Stages 1-4. Thus, in the folk taxonomy, Stages 1-4 are basic linguistic emotion categories. Motives for labeling emotions were driven possibly by the need to maintain social control, the identification of prototypical emotions elicited in interpersonal relationships, and the need for terms to identify intrapersonal emotions. Features of markedness theory were corroborated for English emotion terms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-278
Number of pages32
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume77
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1999

Keywords

  • CULTURAL VARIATIONS
  • FACIAL EXPRESSION
  • CIRCUMPLEX MODEL
  • LIFE-FORMS
  • ENVY
  • ORGANIZATION
  • PERCEPTION
  • EXPERIENCE
  • MOTIVATION
  • SIMILARITY

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