Urban-rural variation in childhood type 1 diabetes incidence in Canterbury, New Zealand, 1980-2004

Laura J. Miller, Jinny A. Willis, Jamie Pearce, Ross Barnett, Brian A. Darlow, Russell S. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Geographical variation in the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes is well documented. Such patterns are thought to give clues to the potential causes of this complex disease. This study examined the urban-rural differences in childhood type 1 diabetes in the Canterbury region of New Zealand between 1980 and 2004. We found significantly higher incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes in satellite urban communities, which could not be explained by the ethnic composition, neighbourhood deprivation, population density or household overcrowding in these areas. Varying levels of immigration and or/commuting in different urban-rural settings could explain this finding. This study highlights the value of geographical investigations for aetiological hypothesis generation. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-256
Number of pages9
JournalHealth & Place
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Childhood
  • New Zealand
  • Poisson regression
  • Urban-rural differences
  • SMALL-AREA VARIATION
  • POPULATION-DENSITY
  • LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA
  • ENVIRONMENTAL-FACTORS
  • SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
  • HYGIENE HYPOTHESIS
  • WESTERN-AUSTRALIA
  • NORTHERN-IRELAND
  • DRINKING-WATER
  • MELLITUS

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