Use of multiperspective qualitative interviews to understand patients’ and carers’ beliefs, experiences, and needs

Marilyn Kendall, Scott A. Murray, Emma Carduff, Allison Worth, Fiona Harris, Anna Lloyd, Debbie Cavers, Elizabeth Grant, Kirsty Boyd, Aziz Sheikh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Linked interviews conducted with patients and their informal and professional carers can generate a richer understanding of needs and experiences than the single perspective most commonly used in qualitative studies. Interview dyads or triads, where two or three participants are interviewed as a set or case study, can explore complex complementary as well as contradictory perspectives, and there is considerable scope for using this method in a range of long term conditions.

Based on our experiences of conducting multiperspective studies and drawing on the wider literature, we summarise when researchers might find multiperspective interviews a useful approach, discuss how to use this approach, consider the data that are generated, and highlight potential pitfalls and how to avoid these.1 2 3 4 5 This paper builds on our previous article discussing the need for longitudinal qualitative approaches.6 Combining longitudinal and multidimensional interviews can prove particularly valuable.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberb4122
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Medical Journal (BMJ)
Volume339
Issue number7739
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Oct 2009

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