Very preterm infants engage in an intervention to train their control of attention: Results from the feasibility study of the Attention Control Training (ACT) randomised trial

Oliver Perra*, Sam Wass, Alison McNulty, David Sweet, Kostas A. Papageorgiou, Matthew Johnston, Delfina Bilello, Aaron Patterson, Fiona Alderdice

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Very premature birth (gestational age between 28 and 31 + 6 weeks) is associated with increased risk of cognitive delay and attention deficit disorder, which have been linked to anomalies in the development of executive functions (EFs) and their precursors. In particular, very preterm (VP) infants display anomalies in controlling attention and gathering task-relevant information. Early interventions that support attention control may be pivotal in providing a secure base for VP children’s later attainments. The Attention Control Training (ACT) is a cognitive training intervention that targets infants’ abilities to select visual information according to varying task demands but had not been tested in VP infants. We conducted a feasibility study to test the processes we intend to use in a trial delivering the ACT to VP infants.
Original languageEnglish
Article number66
JournalPilot and Feasibility Studies
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Mar 2021

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • infant
  • premature
  • feasibility study
  • attention
  • computerised cognitive training
  • eye-tracking methodology

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