Visual deficits in developmental dyslexia: relationships between non-linguistic visual tasks and their contribution to components of reading

Manon Jones, H. P. Branigan, M. L. Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Developmental dyslexia is often characterized by a visual deficit, but the nature of this impairment and how it relates to reading ability is disputed (Brain 2003; 126: 841-865). In order to investigate this issue, we compared groups of adults with and without dyslexia on the Ternus, visual-search and symbols tasks. Dyslexic readers yielded more errors on the visual-search and symbols tasks compared with non-dyslexic readers. A positive correlation between visual-search and symbols task performance suggests a common mechanism shared by these tasks. Performance on the visual-search and symbols tasks also correlated with non-word reading and rapid automatized naming measures, and visual search contributed independent variance to non-word reading. The Ternus task did not discriminate reading groups nor contributed significant variance to reading measures. We consider how visual-attention processes might underlie specific component reading measures. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley \& Sons, Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-115
Number of pages21
JournalDyslexia
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2008

Keywords

  • dyslexia
  • magnocellular
  • dorsal stream
  • letter position encoding

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Visual deficits in developmental dyslexia: relationships between non-linguistic visual tasks and their contribution to components of reading'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this