Weaving society in Late Chalcolithic Anatolia: Textile production and social strategies in the 4th millennium BC

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

The nature and development of textile production in prehistoric Anatolia has received very little systematic attention so far. This paper attempts to show that it is at the end of the 5th millennium BC when we first see a great increase of effort being invested into this field, a development which may be linked to the introduction of wool-producing caprids into the region. The social and economic implications of this development are investigated through a review of the evidence for flax-cultivation, pastoral strategies and the distribution of tools used in textile manufacture. The paper questions views that woven textiles were produced for their use-value and that they served the generation of cumulative wealth in this initial configuration. Alternative explanations are sought to understand better why the production and consumption of textiles suddenly became of central interest to Anatolian societies during the Late Chalcolithic and following times.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWestern Anatolia before Troy. Proto-Urbanisation in the 4th Millennium BC?
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the International Symposium held at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Vienna, Austria, 21‒24 November, 2012
EditorsBarbara Horejs, Mathias Mehofer
Place of PublicationVienna
PublisherAustrian Academy of Sciences Press
Pages421–446
Number of pages26
Volume1
ISBN (Print)9783700177616
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2014

Publication series

NameOriental and European Archaeology
PublisherAustrian Academy of Sciences
Volume1

Keywords

  • Chalcolithic Period
  • Anatolian archaeology
  • textile history

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