Weird tales: The shifting role of science and religion in literature’s search for truth

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

In this chapter, two recent readings of two key literary texts in the ‘Science and Religion in Literature’ field, Shelley’s Frankenstein and Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, are considered as contributions to literature’s search for truth: Greenaway’s Theology, Horror and Fiction and Alder’s Weird Fiction and Science at the Fin de Siècle. A reading of Robertson’s modern novel, The Fanatic, is then offered which draws on insights from both. It is argued that the ‘weird’ might offer a perspective which reflects and deflects scientific and theological concerns about literature’s ability to access truth. The literary presentation of the historical figure of Major Thomas Weir is the focus for a discussion of this approach.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationScience and Religion in Western Literature
Subtitle of host publicationCritical and Theological Studies
EditorsMichael Fuller
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter2
Edition1st
ISBN (Print)9781032077123
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Publication series

NameRoutledge Science and Religion

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Weird tales: The shifting role of science and religion in literature’s search for truth'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this