What are the barriers to recovery perceived by people discharged from a medium-secure forensic mental health unit? An interpretative phenomenological analysis

Simon Stuart, Louise Tansey, Ethel Quayle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Within mental health services, the recovery approach offers a strengths-based framework for working with individuals. It is characterised by a focus on facets such as hope and empowerment: however, these may be less applicable to people within the complex context of the forensic mental health system. Very little research exists into recovery among this population following discharge from inpatient care. This qualitative study explored perceptions of recovery, and the barriers to its achievement, as described by eight former inpatients at a medium-secure forensic hospital. Interpretative phenomenological analysis revealed five superordinate themes: Living in the Shadow of the Past, Power Imbalances, Security and Care, Reconfigured Relationships, and ‘Recovery’ as a Barrier to Recovery. The analysis also allowed for an examination of participants’ values, and how these related to recovery processes. Clinical and research implications are discussed, and suggestions are made for the development of the recovery approach within forensic services.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-31
Number of pages31
JournalJournal of Theoretical and Philosophical Criminology
Volume9
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 10 Feb 2017

Keywords

  • values
  • recovery
  • community
  • forensic
  • health care
  • mental health and illness

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