When transfiguration became commonplace

Neil Mulholland, Norman Hogg

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract / Description of output

In the included essay “When Transfiguration Became Commonplace," the art collective The Confraternityof Neoflagellants (CoN) refers to theindividual user within a networkedculture (particularly in the context of peer-to-peer computing) as a person-object produced via its social networks. According to CoN, the person-object is not “considered solely in terms of its “thing-ness” alone, but must rather be considered as a relational hub or conduit within a network of inter-human subjectivities.” Data, in this sense, can be understood as the highly effective accumulation of embodied human relations. When Transfiguration Became Commonplace follows the early career of developer, content curator, and entrepreneurial provocateur Alexandr Petrovsky. Free&d-ing at WILLARD: TECHNOLOGY FOR ENCHANTMENT, Petrovsky ruthlessly mobilises metahistorical anachronisms as ever-expanding invocations of possible futures to navigate and conquer the flatland “an infinite hell of punitive creativity.” Petrovsky’s development of the bioinformatic Brandeum project exploits neomedievalism’s elasticated temporal looping and folding, opening a untimely perspective on the emerging hypereconomics of the 21st century and related non-modern futurities.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSpooky Action
Subtitle of host publicationA Materialist Nightmare
EditorsPatricia Margarita Hernandez
Place of PublicationMiami
PublisherNAME
Pages42-97
ISBN (Print)9780984056613
Publication statusPublished - 16 May 2016

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Neomedievalism
  • Contemporary Art
  • Animism
  • New Materialism
  • Neomaterialism
  • Nonmodern
  • Premodern
  • Digital Cultures
  • Futurism

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