Who Am I? The Developing Self-Concept of Scottish-Born Chinese Children: A Comparison With White Scottish, Mainland Chinese, and Hong Kong Chinese Children

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Abstract

This study explored cultural similarities and differences in personal and social identity across four groups of children (Mainland Chinese, Hong Kong Chinese, British born Chinese (BBC) and White Scottish in three age groups (ages 8, 11 and 14 years) (N=454). The ‘Who am I?’ self-description questionnaire was employed. The results revealed significant differences in children’s understanding of social self across the cultural groups. All cultural groups of children’s responses indicated that individual-self was the most common form of identity. However, the Chinese groups emphasized more collective-self responses than White Scottish children. Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong Chinese children’s perception of their individual-self increased across age groups. Study findings provided new insights into the developmental and cultural complexities in children’s identities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-249
JournalIdentity
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2016

Keywords

  • social identity, cross-cultural comparison, development

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