Why and how might genetic and phylogenetic diversity be reflected in the identification of key biodiversity areas?

T. M. Brooks*, A. Cuttelod, D. P. Faith, J. Garcia-Moreno, P. Langhammer, S. Perez-Espona

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

'Key biodiversity areas' are defined as sites contributing significantly to the global persistence of biodiversity. The identification of these sites builds from existing approaches based on measures of species and ecosystem diversity and process. Here, we therefore build from the work of Sgro et al. (2011 Evol. Appl. 4, 326-337. (doi:10.1111/j.1752-4571.2010.00157.x)) to extend a framework for how components of genetic diversity might be considered in the identification of key biodiversity areas. We make three recommendations to inform the ongoing process of consolidating a key biodiversity areas standard: (i) thresholds for the threatened species criterion currently consider a site's share of a threatened species' population; expand these to include the proportion of the species' genetic diversity unique to a site; (ii) expand criterion for 'threatened species' to consider 'threatened taxa' and (iii) expand the centre of endemism criterion to identify as key biodiversity areas those sites holding a threshold proportion of the compositional or phylogenetic diversity of species (within a taxonomic group) whose restricted ranges collectively define a centre of endemism. We also recommend consideration of occurrence of EDGE species (i.e. threatened phylogenetic diversity) in key biodiversity areas to prioritize species-specific conservation actions among sites.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20140019
Number of pages7
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume370
Issue number1662
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jan 2015

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • key biodiversity areas
  • genetic diversity
  • phylogenetic diversity
  • adaptive potential
  • evolutionary refugia
  • CONSERVATION UNITS
  • PLANT DIVERSIFICATION
  • EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY
  • POPULATION-GENETICS
  • LANDSCAPE GENETICS
  • PRIORITY AREAS
  • HOTSPOTS
  • PRIORITIZATION
  • SYSTEMATICS
  • MARKERS

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