Why is this happening? A brief measure of parental attributions assessing parents’ intentionality, permanence, and dispositional attributions of their child with conduct problems

Vilas Sawrikar, Antonio Mendoza Diaz, Caroline Moul, David Hawes, Mark Dadds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We present and evaluate a new self-report measure of parental attributions developed for assessing child causal and dispositional attributions in parenting interventions. The Parent Attribution Measure (PAM) ascribes attributions along first-order dimensions of intentionality, permanence, likeability, and disposition, and a higher-order Total Scale. The psychometric analyses involved participants drawn from populations of clinical (n = 318) and community-based families (n = 214) who completed questionnaires assessing parental attributions, parenting behaviours, parental depression, parental feelings about the child, and child behavioural problems. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that a 3-factor hierarchical structure provided a close fitting model. The model with intentionality, permanence, and disposition (consolidating likeability and disposition) dimensions as first-order factors grouped under a higher-order general factor was validated in independent samples and demonstrated sound psychometric properties. The PAM presents as a brief measure of parental attributions assessing parents’ intentionality, permanence, and dispositional attributions of their child with conduct problems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363-373
Number of pages12
JournalChild psychiatry and human development
Volume50
Early online date8 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Keywords

  • parental attributions
  • child conduct problems
  • parent attribution measure
  • parent training
  • psychometric properties

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