Wildlife management conflicts in rural communities: A case-study of wild boar (sus scrofa) management in Ērgļu Novads, Latvia

Joanna Storie, Simon Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Wildlife conflicts are often characterised by conflicts between groups due to an incompatible understanding of the management of the resource. Latvia has experienced an increase in wild boar numbers and associated damage due to improved habitat, caused by land abandonment and actions taken by hunting organisations to maintain boar populations. In Ērgļu Novads, an administrative district of Latvia where the damage is particularly intense, wild boar management is a contentious and emotive issue among different groups within the community. This study sought to investigate the ecological, economic and social dynamics of the conflict using qualitative interviews with members of different interest groups, conducted according to a conceptual framework developed by White et al. (2009) to analyse biodiversity management conflicts. Results showed high wild boar numbers, poorly written contracts between landowners and hunters and a lack of trust between various stakeholder groups, such as landowners, hunters and the authorities, causing conflicts, as well as a lack of effective dialogue preventing the elaboration of solutions. The study identified the need for all stakeholders, including the authorities, to listen more seriously to those most affected by the damage.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-86
Number of pages23
JournalSociologia Ruralis
Volume57
Issue number1
Early online date19 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jan 2017

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