Edinburgh Research Explorer

Assembly of hundreds of microbial genomes from the cow rumen reveals novel microbial species encoding enzymes with roles in carbohydrate metabolism

Dataset

Related Edinburgh Organisations

PublisherEdinburgh DataShare
Date made available13 Jul 2017

Abstract

The cow rumen is a specialised organ adapted for the efficient breakdown of plant material into energy and nutrients, and it is the rumen microbiome that encodes the enzymes responsible. Many of these enzymes are of huge industrial interest. Despite this, rumen microbes are under-represented in the public databases. Here we present 220 high quality bacterial and archaeal genomes assembled directly from 768 gigabases of rumen metagenomic sequence data. Comparative analysis with current publicly available genomes reveals that the majority of these represent previously unsequenced strains and species of bacteria and archaea. The genomes contain over 13,000 proteins predicted to be involved in carbohydrate metabolism, over 90% of which do not have a good match in the public databases. Inclusion of the 220 genomes presented here improves metagenomic read classification by 2-3-fold, both in our data and in other publicly available rumen datasets. This release improves the coverage of rumen microbes in the public databases, and represents a hugely valuable resource for biomass-degrading enzyme discovery and studies of the rumen microbiome.

Data Citation

Watson, Mick. (2017). Assembly of hundreds of microbial genomes from the cow rumen reveals novel microbial species encoding enzymes with roles in carbohydrate metabolism, [dataset]. The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh. http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/2099.

ID: 39569920