Edinburgh Research Explorer

The potential of eye-tracking as a sensitive measure of behavioural change in response to intervention: processed data set

Dataset

Related Edinburgh Organisations

PublisherEdinburgh DataShare
Date made available2 Oct 2018

Abstract

This data set accompanies an article published in Nature Scientific Reports:
Fletcher-Watson, S., & Hampton, S. (2018) The potential of eye-tracking as a sensitive measure of behavioural change in response to intervention. Nature Scientific Reports, DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-32444-9

Participants were presented with a range of static visual stimuli and their eye positions recorded at a rate of 60Hz. From these raw data we extracted information about the duration, location and timing of fixations. Data are organised by area of interest (a defined region of the stimulus - e.g. the face of someone depicted in a photo) and stimulus. For each variable type, means are calculated across multiple stimuli within a category (e.g. low, medium and high complexity stimuli) and for each type of area of interest (e.g. people, objects).

The data are processed from raw output from a Tobii X60 eye-tracker. Three spreadsheets provide:
1. total fixation durations for each stimulus, and each area of interest within a stimulus
2. time to first fixate (i.e. duration from stimulus onset to first fixation made in a specific area of interest), for each stimulus and area of interest within a stimulus.
3. fixations before (i.e. the number of individual fixations made before the first fixation in a specific area of interest), for each stimulus and area of interest within a stimulus.

Data are produced in two blocks of rows, representing data collected at timepoint 1 and timepoint 2.

A fourth tab provides a glossary of all variable labels and colour codes.

Data Citation

Hampton, Sarah; Fletcher-Watson, Sue. (2018). The potential of eye-tracking as a sensitive measure of behavioural change in response to intervention: processed data set, [dataset]. University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh Medical School. DART lab. http://dx.doi.org/10.7488/ds/2450.

ID: 76892567