Edinburgh Research Explorer

Iris Oren

(Former employee or visitor)

Profile photo

Willingness to take PhD students: Yes

Circuit dysfunction in dementia - self funded students

Biography

I completed my BSc in physics at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. I was awarded my DPhil from Oxford in 2007 for my investigations of the synaptic mechanisms underlying hippocampal gamma frequency network oscillations. I then moved to University College London for my post-doctoral work. In 2012, I took up the University of Edinburgh Chancellor’s Fellowship in the Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems

Qualifications

2003 – 2007: DPhil in Neuroscience, Oxford University, UK.

2002 – 2003: MSc in Neuroscience, Oxford University, UK.

2001 - 2002: BSc, Honours in Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Graduated with distinction.

1997 - 2000: BSc majoring in Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Graduated with distinction.

Research Interests

I am interested in understanding the how changes to neuronal circuits contribute to both the cognitive deficits and pathological progression of Alzheimer's disease.

 

Research Groups

Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems

Muir Maxwell Epilepsy Centre

 

Research students

PhD students:

  • Keir Shaffick-Richardson. Oct 2013 - present

MSc students

  • Keir Shaffick-Richardson (2013)
  • Robin Rough-Willows (2015)
  • Mary Jones (2015)
  • Tom Kiss (2016)
  • Zuzanna Stawicka (2016)

 

 

 

 

My research in a nutshell

The hippocampus is a region in the brain that is critical for learning and memory, and one of the first regions affected in Alzheimer’s disease. The proper functioning of the hippocampus relies on the communication between specialized types of brain cells (neurons). In particular, different types of inhibitory neurons control or modulate the activity of other neurons, and so are critical in memory function. My laboratory is interested in how changes to inhibitory cells in the hippocampus can alter circuit function in diseases that affect memory, such as Alzheimer's disease.

Teaching

I teach statistics and data handlng on the following courses

  • Honours Medical Sciences
  • Honours Neuroscience
  • Honours Physiology
  • MSc by Research Integrative Neuroscience

 

 

 

ID: 5816967