Edinburgh Research Explorer

Equipment for supporting microsystems research at Edinburgh & IMRC related project at Cambridge, Cranfield, Heriot-Watt

Project: Research

StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/11/0531/08/08
Total award£497,764.00
Funding organisationEPSRC
Funder project referenceEP/C541820/1
Period1/11/0531/08/08

Description

This project was to procuring equipment for supporting microsystems research at Edinburgh and IMRC related projects at Cambridge, Cranfield, Heriot Watt and Loughborough. The two items of equipment were a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) an anodic bonder.

PIV has been used to characterise the flow distribution in microchannels arising from different distributor designs, which is of major interest to
designers of microscale cooling technologies. With the increase in the volume of microfluidic related research at the SMC (in addition to that of the
Institute of Materials and Processes) the availability of this type of characterisation become more essential.

Optimisation of anodic bonding has been undertaken which involved the development of modified test structures. This technology has been applied to the fabrication of microchannel devices (projects involving Edinburgh, Heriot Watt and Brunel), the first implementation of a patented bio-sensor (Newcastle), microfluidic devices for mass spec applications (the RASOR proteomics project (Glasgow, Edinburgh and Dundee)) and a motion device involving Heriot Watt. The latter of these was a device that a company in Norway had been unable to manufacture for a research project. In addition the equipment has also been used for low temperature fusion bonding and a process developed for 3-D interconnect for integrating MEMS with standard CMOS technology that takes advantage of the equipment's pressure capability. The pressure capability has also been used as part of the process to fabricate the science grade detectors for SCUBA-2 which have now been commissioned at the JCM telescope in Hawaii. The availability of the bonder has also provided the opportunity to become involved with more industrially funded R&D projects (e.g. Novatrans and Dataslide, the details of which are confidential).

Layman's description

This project was to procuring equipment for supporting microsystems research at Edinburgh and IMRC related projects at Cambridge, Cranfield, Heriot Watt and Loughborough. The two items of equipment were a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) an anodic bonder.
PIV has been used to characterise the flow distribution in microchannels arising from different distributor designs, which is of major interest to designers of microscale cooling technologies.
The anodic bonder has been used to bond wafers that have been used to manufacture the SCUBA-2 detectors.

Project relations

Research outputs