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A method for the allocation of sequencing resources in genotyped livestock populations

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Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47
JournalGenetics Selection Evolution
Volume49
Issue number1
Early online date18 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 May 2017

Abstract

Background
This paper describes a method, called AlphaSeqOpt, for the allocation of sequencing resources in livestock populations with existing phased genomic data to maximise the ability to phase and impute sequenced haplotypes into the whole population.

Methods
We present two algorithms. The first selects focal individuals that collectively represent the maximum possible portion of the haplotype diversity in the population. The second allocates a fixed sequencing budget among the families of focal individuals to enable phasing of their haplotypes at the sequence level. We tested the performance of the two algorithms in simulated pedigrees. For each pedigree, we evaluated the proportion of population haplotypes that are carried by the focal individuals and compared our results to a variant of the widely-used key ancestors approach and to two haplotype-based approaches. We calculated the expected phasing accuracy of the haplotypes of a focal individual at the sequence level given the proportion of the fixed sequencing budget allocated to its family.

Results
AlphaSeqOpt maximises the ability to capture and phase the most frequent haplotypes in a population in three ways. First, it selects focal individuals that collectively represent a larger portion of the population haplotype diversity than existing methods. Second, it selects focal individuals from across the pedigree whose haplotypes can be easily phased using family-based phasing and imputation algorithms, thus maximises the ability to impute sequence into the rest of the population. Third, it allocates more of the fixed sequencing budget to focal individuals whose haplotypes are more frequent in the population than to focal individuals whose haplotypes are less frequent. Unlike existing methods, we additionally present an algorithm to allocate part of the sequencing budget to the families (i.e. immediate ancestors) of focal individuals to ensure that their haplotypes can be phased at the sequence level, which is essential for enabling and maximising subsequent sequence imputation.

Conclusions
We present a new method for the allocation of a fixed sequencing budget to focal individuals and their families such that the final sequenced haplotypes, when phased at the sequence level, represent the maximum possible portion of the haplotype diversity in the population that can be sequenced and phased at that budget.

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