Edinburgh Research Explorer

An Internet of Cars: Connecting the Flow of Things to People, Artefacts, Environments and Businesses

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Related Edinburgh Organisations

Open Access permissions

Open

Documents

  • Download as Adobe PDF

    Rights statement: © C. Speed & D. Shingleton, 2012. Speed, C., & Shingleton, D. (2012). An Internet of Cars: Connecting the Flow of Things to People, Artefacts, Environments and Businesses. In Sense Transport '12 Proceedings of the 6th ACM workshop on Next generation mobile computing for dynamic personalised travel planning. (pp. 11-12). ACM Association for Computing Machinery

    Final published version, 505 KB, PDF document

http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2307883&dl=ACM&coll=DL&CFID=133841203&CFTOKEN=10420582
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSense Transport '12
Subtitle of host publication Proceedings of the 6th ACM workshop on Next generation mobile computing for dynamic personalised travel planning
PublisherACM Association for Computing Machinery
Pages11-12
ISBN (Print)978-1-4503-1325-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012
EventSense Transport '12 - Proceedings of the 6th ACM workshop on Next generation mobile computing for dynamic personalised travel planning - Low Wood Bay, Lake District, United Kingdom
Duration: 25 Jun 201229 Jun 2012

Conference

ConferenceSense Transport '12 - Proceedings of the 6th ACM workshop on Next generation mobile computing for dynamic personalised travel planning
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLow Wood Bay, Lake District
Period25/06/1229/06/12

Abstract

In this paper, the authors introduce a creative approach to conceiving cars as data packets through the use of their license registration plate and offering a playful platform that allows users to engage with them as though they were part of social media. The paper introduces the concept of the Internet of Things and suggests that a barrier exists that is preventing the general public from conceiving cars as being part of a similar network. The authors identify similarities between existing tagging technologies that support objects to be tracked through the internet but highlight the apparent oversight of cars to offer the same capabilities. The authors present a vision for a platform that leverages the unique identifying properties of car registration plates and introduces a cultural project in which people will be able to ‘play’ with cars as they might data through games, messaging services, and visualisations.

    Research areas

  • travel, network

Download statistics

No data available

ID: 4118489