Edinburgh Research Explorer

CFHTLenS: co-evolution of galaxies and their dark matter haloes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • Michael J. Hudson
  • Bryan Gillis
  • Jean Coupon
  • Hendrik Hildebrandt
  • Thomas Erben
  • Catherine Heymans
  • Henk Hoekstra
  • Thomas D. Kitching
  • Yannick Mellier
  • Lance Miller
  • Ludovic Van Waerbeke
  • Christopher Bonnett
  • Liping Fu
  • Konrad Kuijken
  • Barnaby Rowe
  • Tim Schrabback
  • Elisabetta Semboloni
  • Edo van Uitert
  • Malin Velander

Related Edinburgh Organisations

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)298-314
Number of pages17
JournalMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume447
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Feb 2015

Abstract

Galaxy-galaxy weak lensing is a direct probe of the mean matter distribution around galaxies. The depth and sky coverage of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey yield statistically significant galaxy halo mass measurements over a much wider range of stellar masses (10(8.75) to 10(11.3) M-circle dot) and redshifts (0.2 <z <0.8) than previous weak lensing studies. At redshift z similar to 0.5, the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR) reaches a maximum of 4.0 +/- 0.2 per cent as a function of halo mass at similar to 10(12.25) M-circle dot. We find, for the first time from weak lensing alone, evidence for significant evolution in the SHMR: the peak ratio falls as a function of cosmic time from 4.5 +/- 0.3 per cent at z similar to 0.7 to 3.4 +/- 0.2 per cent at z similar to 0.3, and shifts to lower stellar mass haloes. These evolutionary trends are dominated by red galaxies, and are consistent with a model in which the stellar mass above which star formation is quenched 'downsizes' with cosmic time. In contrast, the SHMR of blue, star-forming galaxies is well fitted by a power law that does not evolve with time. This suggests that blue galaxies form stars at a rate that is balanced with their dark matter accretion in such a way that they evolve along the SHMR locus. The redshift dependence of the SHMR can be used to constrain the evolution of the galaxy population over cosmic time.

    Research areas

  • gravitational lensing: weak, galaxies: haloes, cosmology: observations, dark matter, TELESCOPE LENSING SURVEY, STELLAR MASS FUNCTION, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES, SHAPE MEASUREMENT, OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION, LAMBDA-CDM, REDSHIFT, LUMINOSITY, EVOLUTION, SIMULATIONS

ID: 21278476