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Diesel Exhaust Particle Exposure In Vitro Alters Monocyte Differentiation and Function

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Original languageEnglish
Article numberARTN e51107
Number of pages12
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Dec 2012

Abstract

Air pollution by diesel exhaust particles is associated with elevated mortality and increased hospital admissions in individuals with respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. During active inflammation monocytes are recruited to the airways and can replace resident alveolar macrophages. We therefore investigated whether chronic fourteen day exposure to low concentrations of diesel exhaust particles can alter the phenotype and function of monocytes from healthy individuals and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Monocytes were purified from the blood of healthy individuals and people with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in the presence or absence of diesel exhaust particles and their phenotypes studied through investigation of their lifespan, cytokine generation in response to Toll like receptor agonists and heat killed bacteria, and expression of surface markers. Chronic fourteen day exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to concentrations of diesel exhaust particles >10 mu g/ml caused mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction, and a gradual loss of cells over time both in healthy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease individuals. Chronic exposure to lower concentrations of diesel exhaust particles impaired CXCL8 cytokine responses to lipopolysaccharide and heat killed E. coli, and this phenotype was associated with a reduction in CD14 and CD11b expression. Chronic diesel exhaust particle exposure may therefore alter both numbers and function of lung macrophages differentiating from locally recruited monocytes in the lungs of healthy people and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Research areas

  • PARTICULATE AIR-POLLUTION, CIGARETTE-SMOKE, ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES, CHEMICALS, LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE, HEALTHY HUMANS, BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL-CELLS, INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES, RELEASE, OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY-DISEASE

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